jusca

Movin' on Up: Lesson 2

Rate this Entry
Lesson 1 Update:

Quick rundown on a week of lesson 1: I've gotten more comfortable with the reverse fretting (4321) of the 4x4 exercise. Plucking 8th notes on the right hand feels more relaxed and easier. The order of the notes (calling flats & sharps) are becoming easier to remember. I used to have to think really hard about what came after Gb or D sometimes. Now, not so much.

Lesson 2
I've arrived at Lesson 2. I looked at this lesson many months ago. I was totally overwhelmed by the amount of scales to learn and didn't think I could learn all the material. Well, I had a lightbulb moment recently. I thought to myself "How about I only learn 2 scales per week?" Yep, that seems like it would do the trick. It was enough to not be overwhelmed and definitely enough to make progress where it wouldn't take months and months of end for one scale at a time. I have learned from practicing guitar and drums that perfection on one exercise or chord doesn't need to be attained. Everything in music kind of fits together at some point. Learning one scale then moving on will still build the skill and knowledge through frequent review.

Major Scale Learning Schedule
Week 1: C & F
2: Bb & Eb
3: Ab & Db
4: Gb & G
5: D & A
6: E & B
7: F#

I also had another realization. 145 of the scale is a type of chord. I knew 135 is a major triad. I got really curious about scale degrees and chord formulas. If 135 is a major chord, then what kind of chord is a 145? What about a 1246? What if the chord has no "1"--is this even possible? My mind started running too far. LOL. I backed off on the last question. Getting too deep into theory too soon. But I learned a 145 is a suspended chord. I've play guitar for some years now. I think "Keep It Simple Blues" should have the chords written on top of the music, it'll be easier for me to know which chord to play instead of thinking 135, and more like C major -- play CEG notes. Oh well, that's my little way of looking at it. On a similar note, I used to think if the song was in a key, say key of C, then the scale to play over the whole song was the C major scale. But looking at chord tones, it seems that the chords in the progression take notes from other scales. Like the 1 4 5 in F, the 1 is the F major root comes from that scale. The 4 is the root note of the Bb major scale and the 5 is the root notes of the C major scale. So when the the 4 chord is played, you can play the 135 of the Bb scale? Ahhh, I'm tihnking too much again. I'll figure it out later. One day at a time. I'm just so excited to see this stuff unfold before me.






Chord formulas: http://guitar.davidsouthwick.net/chords/chord-formulas/ http://www.guitar-chords.org.uk/chords-key-f.html
How to practice scales: http://www.studybass.com/lessons/bas...actice-scales/
Chord tones: http://www.studybass.com/lessons/bas...s-are-primary/

Submit "Movin' on Up:  Lesson 2" to Digg Submit "Movin' on Up:  Lesson 2" to del.icio.us Submit "Movin' on Up:  Lesson 2" to StumbleUpon Submit "Movin' on Up:  Lesson 2" to Google

Updated 08-20-2015 at 10:07 PM by jusca

Tags: None Add / Edit Tags
Categories
Uncategorized

Comments

  1. Elmeaux's Avatar
    Fantastic! Keep up the good work!!
  2. brian_primrose's Avatar
    +1 to Elmeaux's comment

    Re chords derived from teh scale, check out the following. You are almost there!

    http://www.guitarorb.com/forming-chords-from-scales/

    Brian
  3. jusca's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Elmeaux
    Fantastic! Keep up the good work!!
    thank you!
  4. jusca's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by brian_primrose
    +1 to Elmeaux's comment

    Re chords derived from teh scale, check out the following. You are almost there!

    http://www.guitarorb.com/forming-chords-from-scales/

    Brian
    ooh mind candy! nice stuff to think over and understand. thanks Brian!!