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Thread: Lesson 101 - How to play "Black Sheep" (from the Deeper Blues Album : "Dig the Hole")

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    I appreciate that a tab will be provided.

    I'm sure real musicians that read think that's a bad thing but I'm well into my 40s, not interested in doing studio work or playing in a band. I just want to play bass. I guess at this point I am more interested in "how" rather than "why" and adding layers of additional learning on top of actually playing impacts my desire to play. I guess I'm a paint-by-numbers kind of gal.

    I tried the Gibson Learn and Master Guitar and LOVED it until the third lesson or so when they removed the tab probably because they thought it was for the players own good doing so. For me, and people like me, it had the opposite effect.

    I'm really looking forward to these lessons now. Thank you for putting them together!

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    I've been playing around with this for about 45 minutes now and am having a blast playing along with the video above. It's cool because it's very similar to Shuffling Along in the course so it's not unfamiliar. Lots of fun.

  3. #23
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    Nashville Number System?

    Look ahead in your DVDs. Roy has talks about it and its use in DVD #10, Lesson #19.

    Without going into detail, it is basically a numbering system that identifies the notes in the scale to play. Because it is a number system relative to the root, it can be applied to any key as long as you know the root of the key.

    So . . . , if the lead singer says, "That's too high for me today, let's drop it down a full tone", there's no transposing to do on the page, just move to the new root and play.
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  4. #24
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    Mar 2011
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    Charlottesville, VA.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick View Post
    Can you clarify your "Nashvill Number System" for us ?
    What is it and what's the difference between that and standard notation.
    Roy provides an explanation of the Nashville Number System in lesson 19 of TMBG. This is one case where peaking ahead is not contraindicated. I really think that he wouldn't mind as it is not directly related to actual playing technique. Also, a quick search on google will obtain a plethora of articles explaining the NNS.
    Bass Rx When Feeling Blue:
    I I I I IV IV I I V IV I I
    Repeat As Necessary.

    (Minor Variations Allowed)

  5. #25

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    I'll have a look at those lessons when I have the time for it.

    for now I added the TAB version of the Sheet Music to the original post so you can now download the TABS if you want it.

    Note: Lane did not completely check this version, he checked an older one and told me what to fix so I cannot guarantee that the tabs are 100% accurate but I'm sure Lane will inform me as soon as he has time to check the TABS.
    Last edited by Patrick; 01-13-2013 at 01:12 PM.
    Fender 2012 American Standard Precision Bass (Left-handed)
    Fender '59 Bassman LTD.









  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Charlottesville, VA.
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    219

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    Thanks, Patrick. That was a great job. The only thing that I'd change is that instead of playing open notes I would play the fifth fret of the the lower (in tone) string. This is a chord pattern that can be moved around the fret board. Lane describes this pattern as "going downtown." This is a commonly used pattern in Blues and consists of playing the root of the chord then the octave then the dominant seventh and finishing with the fifth. For a G chord (I chord) the pattern is second finger on the third fret of the E string, fourth finger on the fifth fret of the D string, second finger on the third fret of the D string, and the forth finger on the fifth fret of the A string. For the C chord (IV chord) use the same pattern starting on the third fret of the A string. For the D chord (V chord) use the same pattern starting on the fifth fret of the A string. The only time you need to use an open string in this song is the low E in measure 56 (unless you have a 5 string or 6 string bass then you can use the fifth fret of the B string). By the way, this same pattern is used in "Shufflin' Along" in lesson 6 of TMBG, only it starts on the fifth fret of the E string (A chord).

    Also the Nashville Numbering System does not tell the bass player what specific notes to play in the bass line. It tells the bass player the chord progression for the song and the bass player develops the bass line in accordance with the chord progression, the genre, the melody, the feel of the song, etc. Apparently, note for note transcriptions in either standard notation or tabulature usually only occur after a song is recorded if/when it becomes popular.
    Bass Rx When Feeling Blue:
    I I I I IV IV I I V IV I I
    Repeat As Necessary.

    (Minor Variations Allowed)

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    I scanned the pdf of the notation sheet into Sibelius and generated a tab. I got the open notes as well but manually changed them to the 5th fret on the lower string and it's perfect.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by bassischill View Post
    I scanned the pdf of the notation sheet into Sibelius and generated a tab. I got the open notes as well but manually changed them to the 5th fret on the lower string and it's perfect.
    Yes, for some reason notition software decides to use open strings.

    Anyway, I modified my file so I HOPE it's correct now (let me know if I still need to edit it).
    Fender 2012 American Standard Precision Bass (Left-handed)
    Fender '59 Bassman LTD.









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    Does anyone have any suggested fingerings for measure 34? The only one that semi-works is 2-2-1-2-1-2-4-2 but moving from the second 2nd fret to the 3rd with my first finger while having the 2nd finger on the G, I am hitting the fret way way back and sometimes get buzz.

    I have tried several and watched the video over and over and over and over again and there is no way I can tell what is being used. I'm amazed that anyone can watch Roy in the course or this video and figure out which frets are being pressed. I've tried time and time again and just can't do it.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Charlottesville, VA.
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    Bassischill, I've looked at the video and it looks like the fingering that Lane is using is 2-2-1-2-3-2-4-1. The chord intervals are 1-1-6-1-b7-1-8-1. This appears to be one of the exceptions to his normal pattern of using the first finger on the third fret and the fourth finger on the fifth fret. It seems that he has to use this pattern because of the 6 note on the second fret. Then he uses the second and third fingers on the 1 note and b7 note, respectively. Notice how he uses his first finger for the final 1 note of the measure to set up his normal 1-1-4-4-1-1-4-4 finger pattern in the next measure. By the way, he explains why he uses that pattern here:

    http://basslessonshq.com/blues-lessons/basic-blues/

    I usually have the same problem seeing what Roy and Lane (among others) are doing with their fretting hand. Really good players that can play really fast have developed an economy of motion in their fretting hand that means that, unlike in my case, their fingers are not flying up and down all over the place. Their fingers hover right over the strings and it's hard to actually see when they are fretting a note because their fingers move such a short distance.

    Hope this helps.
    Bass Rx When Feeling Blue:
    I I I I IV IV I I V IV I I
    Repeat As Necessary.

    (Minor Variations Allowed)

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